BMW 2-Series Active Tourer mini MPV: a FWD Opel Meriva fighter

BMW has unveiled its first F56 Mini-based front-wheel drive model, the mini people mover: 2-Series Active Tourer.


Using a stretched version of the front-wheel drive platform first seen in the F56 Mini, BMW has created its first people mover and its first front-wheel drive model; xDrive-branded all-wheel drive models will be available later. Quite why it’s badged as a 2-Series is beyond us — we thought that even numbered models were meant to be coupes, convertibles, and otherwise sporty and less practical variants.

Sized to compete with the Opel Meriva and other small people movers, the 2-Series Active Tourer has seating for five, and a rear seat that can move forward to create more luggage space and splits 40/20/40. The nice looking interior features a large entertainment and nav screen, iDrive controller, and internet connectivity.

Among the available tech, the 2-Series Active Tourer features active cruise control that works in stop/start traffic, automated parking, head-up display, speed sign recognition, automatic high beams, and lane departure warning.

But the big question is: is it a real BMW?

Dimensions

Length: 4,342mm
Width: 1,800mm
Height: 1,555mm
Wheelbase: 2,670mm
Boot space: 468L (seats up); 1,510L (seats down)

Engines, performance, fuel economy

218i Active Tourer 225i Active Tourer 218d Active Tourer
Fuel Petrol Petrol Diesel
Engine 1.5L 3-cylinder turbo 2L 4-cylinder turbo 2L 4-cylinder turbo
Transmission/s 6-speed manual
6-speed auto
8-speed auto 6-speed manual
8-speed auto
Power 100kW 170kW 110kW
Torque 220Nm 350Nm 330Nm
0-100km/h 9.3-9.6s 6.8 8.9s
Top speed 200km/h 235km/h 205km/h
Fuel economy
City 6.2L/100km 7.6L/100km 5L/100km
Highway 4.5L/100km 5L/100km 3.8L/100km
Combined 5.1L/100km 6L/100km 4.1L/100km
CO2 emissions 119g/km 139g/km 109g/km
Derek Fung

Derek Fung

Derek has a lifelong love for all things automotive, from the dullest Camry to record shattering Bugattis. Prior to starting up Between the Axles he was a reviewer for CNET Australia and the founding editor of its Car Technology channel. [Read more]